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Cinderella across Cultures

New Directions and Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Edited by Martine Hennard Dutheil de la Rochère, Gillian Lathey, Monika Wozniak

Fairy-Tale Studies, Women's Studies, Literary Criticism and Theory, Cultural Studies, Folklore

Series in Fairy-Tale Studies

Paperback
Published: June 2016
ISBN: 9780814341551
Pages: 440 Size: 6x9
Illustrations: 50 black and white photographs
eBOOK
Published: June 2016
ISBN: 9780814341568

The Cinderella story is retold continuously in literature, illustration, music, theatre, ballet, opera, film, and other media, and folklorists have recognized hundreds of distinct forms of Cinderella plots worldwide. The focus of this volume, however, is neither Cinderella as an item of folklore nor its alleged universal meaning. In Cinderella across Cultures, editors Martine Hennard Dutheil de la Rochère, Gillian Lathey, and Monika Wozniak analyze the Cinderella tale as a fascinating, multilayered, and ever-changing story constantly reinvented in different media and traditions.

The collection highlights the tale’s reception and adaptation in cultural and national contexts across the globe, including those of Italy, France, Germany, Britain, the Netherlands, Poland, and Russia. Contributors shed new light on classic versions of Cinderella by examining the material contexts that shaped them (such as the development of glass artifacts and print techniques), or by analyzing their reception in popular culture (through cheap print and mass media). The first section, "Contextualizing Cinderella," investigates the historical and cultural contexts of literary versions of the tale and their diachronic transformations. The second section, "Regendering Cinderella," tackles innovative and daring literary rewritings of the tale in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, in particular modern feminist and queer takes on the classic plot. Finally, the third section, "Visualising Cinderella," concerns symbolic transformations of the tale, especially the interaction between text and image and the renewal of the tale’s iconographic tradition.

The volume offers an invaluable contribution to the study of this particular tale and also to fairy­­-tale studies overall. Readers interested in the visual arts, in translation studies, or in popular culture, as well as a wider audience wishing to discover the tale anew will delight in this collection.

Martine Hennard Dutheil de la Rochère is professor of English and comparative literature at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland. She is the author of Reading, Translating, Rewriting: Angela Carter's Translational Poetics (Wayne State University Press, 2013).

Gillian Lathey is Senior Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Roehampton, London, where from 2004 to 2012 she was Director of the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature. She is the author of The Role of Translators in Children’s Literature: Invisible Storytellers and Translating Children’s Literature and is co-editor with Vanessa Joosen of Grimms’ Tales Around The Globe: The Dynamics of Their International Reception (Wayne State University Press, 2014).

Monika Wozniak is associate professor of Polish language and literature at Sapienza University of Rome. She has published extensively in Polish, Italian, and English. She is the co-author of the Polish-language monograph Przeklady w systemie malych literatur (Translations in the System of Minor Literatures, 2014).

Contributors Include:
Ruth B. Bottigheimer, Kathryn Hoffmann, Gillian Lathey, Cyrille François, Talitha Verheij, Daniel Aranda, Martine Hennard Dutheil de la Rochère, Ashley Riggs, Mark MacLeod, Jennifer Orme, Rona May-Ron, Roxane Hughes, Sandra L. Beckett, Jan Van Coillie, Monika Wozniak, Agata Holobut, Xenia Mitrokhina, Jack Zipes

The most comprehensive and multi-faceted volume on Cinderella imaginable, covering subjects as varied as the seventeenth-century obsession with glass, publishing history, gender transmutations, and multimedial versions. This remarkable achievement will equally inspire scholars of fairy tales, international literature, popular culture, visual media, and children's literature.

– Maria Nikolajeva, professor at University of Cambridge

These lively, groundbreaking essays are based in contemporary conceptions of fairy tales as an interweaving of forms and traditions. Their approaches to such topics as the role of the translator as co-creator or the situation of any particular fairy-tale text in a local cultural and material context are insightful and intriguing.

– John Stephens, emeritus professor at Macquarie University and co-author of Retelling Stories, Framing Culture

In summary, Cinderella across Cultures abundantly lives up to the promise of its title. Furthermore, this collection proves to be a very worthy addition to the many distinguished books and journals dedicated to the study of fairy tales published by the Wayne State University Press.

– D. L. Ashliman, Gramarye

[. . .] this most recent entry in the Wayne State series is a worthy addition to the small canon of contemporary scholarship focusing on specific tales. It is illuminating and thought-provoking reading, and an essential text for any fairy tale scholar.

– Martha Hixon, Children's Literature Association Quarterly

These lively, groundbreaking essays are based in contemporary conceptions of fairy tales as an interweaving of forms and traditions. Their approaches to such topics as the role of the translator as co-creator or the situation of any particular fairy-tale text in a local cultural and material context are insightful and intriguing.

– John Stephens, emeritus professor at Macquarie University and co-author of <i>Retelling Stories, Framing Culture</i>

A study of the Cinderella narrative no longer confined to folkloristics, it draws from fields as diverse as cultural and media studies, queer theory, translation studies, and museum studies.

– Shilpa Menon, Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature

This collection of articles edited by Martine Hennard Dutheil de la Rochère, Gillian Lathey, and Monika Wozniak is a testimony to the academic and interdisciplinary interest aroused not only by the tale of "Cinderella" but by the fairy tale in general -- on all continents, in all languages, ??and in all disciplines. It reflects the extraordinary plasticity of the genre in adapting to new media, but also in attracting new critical perspectives, whether historical, literary, cultural, or interdisciplinary.

– Jean Mainill, Féeries

Scholars will surely find this collection auspicious, not least because it is overall so well-researched and ambitious, but because the juxtaposition of old and new voices and scholarly styles is as promising a call-to-arms for the growth of single-tale studies and relevance of fairytale studies in general as could be asked for.

– Margot Blankier, Western Folklore